Lifestyle

Common Myths About Sports Injuries

Although there is a large database of publicly accessible knowledge on sports injuries and how to prevent them, many injury healing misconceptions persist. Patients have unrealistic expectations about their recovery as a result of these misconceptions.

There are realities that many people just do not realize, from the severity of certain injuries and how to heal faster to why certain exercises are better than others.

To help understand the accurate information, we’ve compiled a list of the most frequent sports injury misconceptions, as well as the actual facts based on scientific data.

Running is bad for your knees.

Running for fun will not harm your knees. On the contrary, running actually helps strengthen both your bones and muscles. Any joint discomfort you experience after running may be the result of another issue or poor technique.

An ACL rupture will end your career.

An ACL tear is a serious injury that may sideline an athlete for a very long time. It is not, however, the end of a career. An arthroscopic surgery, coupled with a tailored rehab program, will allow you to return to your former level of performance on the field. Many national and international athletes have recovered from ACL injuries and became stronger as a result.

More exercise than what is recommended will improve my injury.

Exercising more than is recommended may be detrimental and cause recovery to be delayed. Keep it to a minimum and take it easy. Have faith in your doctor’s recommendations and you will likely have a smooth and full recovery. Too much exercise could not only hinder your recovery, but also further aggravate your already sensitive injury.

It’s better to rest.

In the event of mild sprains/strains, complete rest is not recommended. Rather than total rest, activity moderation is the way to proceed. Even if you have a significant injury, exercising other areas of your body may help you stay healthy. Too much rest, like most things, isn’t always good, especially for an injury like sciatic inflammation. 

Using heat to cure a serious injury.

Any kind of acute damage produces inflammation, which can cause pain. Cold treatment aids in the reduction of edema and pain. Heat treatment may offer pain relief in certain cases, but it will also increase edema and lead to worse results. Only use heat when a doctor recommends it. A general rule is to treat pain with ice, unless directed otherwise.

Running while wearing a shin splint.

Shin splints are a kind of bone overuse injury that requires rest and activity adjustment. You can’t run with shin splints since it may aggravate the disease and possibly cause a stress fracture. Consult a physician for recommendations for your specific injury. However, running with a shin splint isn’t a good choice.

Glucosamine will help me with my osteoarthritis.

Glucosamine is only used as an adjuvant during treatment of OA and has no value on its own. Joint replacements are the solution to advanced 2 severe sosteoarthritis, with exercise and activity reduction being the cornerstone of therapy. Know your injury and it’s recovery process before trying any therapy on your own.

No pain, no gain.

This is a common phrase a bodybuilder or gym rat will tell you. But, contrary to common perception, you do not need to suffer in order to become stronger. Exercises should be interesting and difficult, but not painful. If you have discomfort while exercising or training, see a doctor to find out why. Do not hurt yourself doing exercises in a manner that will harm you. Research and always exercise correctly.

Ankle sprains aren’t that serious. I don’t need to go to the doctor.

Ankle sprains are among the most frequent sports injuries you’ll see, and they come with a lot of morbidity. A sprain may also include a fracture, ligament damage or even a lesion on the muscle or cartilage. If these injuries are neglected in the early stages, they may be difficult to cure later on.

Strength will save you from being hurt.

Football players would never be hurt if this were true. To be honest, every athlete may sustain an injury at any moment. Muscle strength is essential for allowing your body to lift, leap or sprint. However, there’s always the chance for a muscle tear, ruptured tendon, or a bone break. Athletes who are overworked, dehydrated, or tired are especially susceptible. The best approach to reduce the chance of injury is to exercise and condition properly.

How to deal with an injury legally.

The first step following an injury is to make sure you are okay and to protect yourself from any immediate further injury. From there, once you are settled, discuss your options with a skilled attorney. It all depends on where you are located, in regard to specific laws governing a personal injury. For those in New York City, find out who the best personal injury attorney nyc is and reach out to them. An attorney will evaluate your case and determine if someone is liable for your injury and seek out compensation.

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